Hyperloop One Propulsion System Put To The Test In Nevada

Hyperloop One Propulsion System Put To The Test In Nevada

Hyperloop One is another ambitious project of Elon Musk. The idea is not new for the CEO of Tesla, but he talked about it for the first time in 2013: let’s transport people in tubes at 760 miles an hour (yes, you did the math correctly, that’s the speed of sound). His theory was that the combination of magnets and vacuum tubes would create an environment with friction close to 0, allowing people to move at very high speeds. Let’s put it like this, if this technology will come to life, you’ll be able to get from San Francisco to Los Angeles in 30 minutes, from Bucharest to Vienna in less than 60 minutes.

Today, the Hyperloop One company is one step closer in making Musk’s idea a reality. Hyperloop One CEO Rob Lloyd stated for Gizmodo, “We’ve tested levitation technologies, we’ve tested the aerodynamics in those low-pressure environments, we’ve tested the tube … So we’ve done testing of all the systems but only can demonstrate this if we build it at full-scale.”

See below a video with the successful test done today.

They’ve accelerated a test vehicle on a rail track at speeds of over 300 mph, using the hyperloop’s propulsion tech. This makes me think this is possible, and the technology to get you at 700 mph is available already. From my point of view, the challenging part is building the tubes, and keeping the air out of it. If that vehicle reached ~400 Mph today, I’m sure it won’t have trouble reaching 700 mph in the right environment.

Hyperloop One Propulsion System Put To The Test In Nevada

Hyperloop One Propulsion System Put To The Test In Nevada

In order to makes us understand how the electromagnet engine works, senior vice president of engineering Josh Geigel stated for Gizmodo: “Unlike typical motors, this one has no moving parts. Giegel described the motors as “blades” and what you might get if you took a typical electric motor, cut it down the seam and unrolled it. When powered, these roughly 2-feet tall by 6-inch wide blades create electromagnetic energy that reacts with the pod and pushes it along.”

Like and share this post

Add Comment

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)